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29
May

Andy the Toy Mad Terrier Part 1: Control the fun, control the dog-Drop on Command.

Training self control is the difference between having an ‘I want, I want’ dog, & a ‘Please may I’ dog. It’s even more crucial in high drive dogs who switch on easily & what better way to train than with a fun game. However it’s important that the play is controlled, so things don’t so high your dog can’t follow instruction or relax when requested to do so. An ‘Off’ switch, so to speak.
Andy’s owner was concerned about the levels of excitement shown during play. He is a very bright & very sparky rescue boy who adores toys. This was his first training session with me. Like most switched on, clever dogs, Andy is a trainers dream to work with, as he is so responsive & quick to learn. When living with a dog like this however, they can be equally quick to learn behaviour which might be considered bad mannered, annoying &/or out of control. This can result in frustration, barking/lunging/pulling/on-leash reactivity.
Teaching self control during play means that the dog realises only calm relaxed behaviour gets him his reward-the toy. In real life, this lesson can be applied to anything which the dog wants, but which at certain moment in time, is not accessible to the dog. Throwing tantrums gets you nothing, calm behaviour gets rewarded. Apply this out about to people, kids on bikes, other dogs, leaves blowing in the wind, squirrels or rabbits etc.
As this was only Andy’s first lesson, verbal commands would not be added in until he’s completely comfortable with the new rules of engagement.
At this stage in the training, Andy’s reward for self control, focus on the hander/asking permission & calm behaviour is that he gets the thing he wants-the toy. We allow the dog to get high during play through our body language, but he can only safely do this, if the handler can stop the game & get the toy back when they decide. It’s crucial that you can switch your dog’s excitement off, & then on again when you, the handler decide. Andy is taught that the quicker he spits the toy out & sits calmly, the faster the game will resume. The next lesson he will learn is that even when I don’t control the toy anymore, it’s still not on offer to him, until he’s calm, focused on his handler & he asks permission-See Andy the Toy Mad Terrier Part 2: ‘Please may I?’ not ‘I want, I want’.

Category: Comedy
Uploaded by: muttamorphosis
Hosted: youtube

29
May

Andy the Toy Mad Terrier Part 2: ‘Please may I?’ not ‘I want, I want’.

Training self control is the difference between having an ‘I want, I want’ dog, & a ‘Please may I’ dog. It’s even more crucial in high drive dogs who switch on easily & what better way to train than with a fun game. However it’s important that the play is controlled, so things don’t so high your dog can’t follow instruction or relax when requested to do so. An ‘Off’ switch, so to speak.
Andy’s owner was concerned about the levels of excitement shown during play. He is a very bright & very sparky rescue boy who adores toys. This was his first training session with me. Like most switched on, clever dogs, Andy is a trainers dream to work with, as he is so responsive & quick to learn. When living with a dog like this however, they can be equally quick to learn behaviour which might be considered bad mannered, annoying &/or out of control. This can result in frustration, barking/lunging/pulling/on-leash reactivity.
Teaching self control during play means that the dog realises only calm relaxed behaviour gets him his reward-the toy. In real life, this lesson can be applied to anything which the dog wants, but which at certain moment in time, is not accessible to the dog. Throwing tantrums gets you nothing, calm behaviour gets rewarded. Apply this out about to people, kids on bikes, other dogs, leaves blowing in the wind, squirrels or rabbits etc.
As this was only Andy’s first lesson, verbal commands would not be added in until he’s completely comfortable with the new rules of engagement.
At this stage in the training, Andy’s rewarded for self control, focus on the hander/asking permission & calm behaviour is that he gets the thing he wants-the toy. In real life however, most of the time, the thing which gets your dogs attention cannot be interacted with (a strange dog, person, squirrel, rabbit, toddler, skateboarder etc). At some point in the training Andy will have to learn that self control and calm behaviour gets him a reward, but not necessarily the reward he wants. This is a difficult step for most dogs and one which Andy isn’t quite ready to take yet, at least not in the big wide world of distractions out and about.

Category: Pets & Animals
Uploaded by: muttamorphosis
Hosted: youtube

23
Apr

Guinness Heelwork Progress April 2013

Guinness, working through short spells of basic obedience heelwork, present, article hold & finish. It’s taken almost 18 months to get this far. Never name your dog after a sedative, if you want him to work in dog sports. Guinness has by far been the most difficult Border Collie to motivate that I have worked with to date. As a young pup he could take or leave toys depending on his mood & food was way down his priority list. As he’s gotten older, adding in a little competition with the other dogs there, this has helped create a desire for toys which took about a year to build to a workable level.

I have only recently begun to see short bursts of potential where heelwork is concerned. For a very long time, he looked miserable & fed up. He did everything I asked him to, he just did it reluctantly. I’ve recently started to hide the toy and produce it as reward from my jacket. You can see the games I play with him while training to get him to enjoy himself. Whether or not we can keep this happy attitude for longer periods, or in the environment of competition remains to be seen.

Category: Pets & Animals
Uploaded by: muttamorphosis
Hosted: youtube

3
Apr

Border Collie, Sage searches outdoors.

Border Collie Sage starts his outdoor search training for ginger impregnated mice.

Category: Pets & Animals
Uploaded by: muttamorphosis
Hosted: youtube

27
Mar

A Border Collie, an egg & a key.

Training a retrieve with metal items is a difficult task as most dogs don’t like the feeling of metal against their teeth. Border Collie Sage retrieves a heavy metal key for the ultimate prize, his bouncy egg.

Category: Pets & Animals
Uploaded by: muttamorphosis
Hosted: youtube